Forging Ships

Company I’ve been given and in such company I’ve forgone. A blacksmith by fate, singed in the sweltering ethos of man’s company, of this I do know. Through toil and trouble, in a furnace can be made, with the beating of hammer and anvil, ships that set sail. For all strings are taut, melt like molten bronze in ghastly flame.

Hence enlisted are steps to forge one’s own ships that imperatively drown:

  1. Start your forge in the midst of familiarity. Fill it to the brim with the coal of idle chatter, set to ignite your piece of work.
  2. Choose wisely which ship to forge and of what it is to be forged of for the keener are made of bronze and the colder, estranged made of lead.
  3. Bring the fire up as familiarity quickens to closeness and insert your work piece into this bed of centigrade. After all, timing is of utmost importance.
  4. Heat your piece of work until the colour of rage and passion debuts, emboldening as the temperature rises.
  5. Still the flames and remove the piece. Begin molding its shape for the metamorphosis of definition and detail. Should the edges be square or smooth and rotund, decisions to make as the hammer chips away.
  6. Clean the remnants of charring from the fine surface. Thereafter, dip it into the tides of permanence contained within institutionalized constructions.

These be arrowheads forged to pierce stone hearts, coated with the powders of pleasure or the flakes of falsity. These be tides of passing as forged ships weigh anchor, hoist sail and drift away.

Zomato’s Creative Ad Campaign

When it comes to food, minimalist ad campaigns have certainly proved successful in Zomato’s case, as you can see from their ‘There are two kinds of people’ campaign. With a clean and plain background featuring simple graphics, these ads are a good example of how effective a print advertisement can be in the midst of eye-catching viral videos.

Following the KISS (Keep it simple, stupid!) methodology, these ads are relateable to everyone. We’ve all got that one friend who hates pizza crust (or you are that one friend) or those who eat all the cherries from the cake and those who detest them and pick them off their piece. We all have different food habits and preferences which is exactly what Zomato is playing to in its advertising strategy, hence widening its target audience.

So check it out and answer me this… which kind of person are YOU?

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Comedians- Sad Clowns Wearing the Mask of Humour?

Earlier this week, we lost Academy-award winning actor and comedian Robin Williams to the battle of addiction and depression when he took his own life (may he rest in peace). This reminded me of the fact that perhaps the funniest of people can often be the saddest inside.

After all, Williams wasn’t the only comedian who suffered from clinical depression. The lovable Charlie Chaplin did as does my favourite comedian Jim Carrey. So the question arises of whether or not there is a connection between humour and depression. And it seems the answer is yes.

Perhaps when Monica commented on Chandler’s need to make people like him through his incessant stream of jokes on Friends, she was onto something.

It’s been found that comedians suffer from depression which is linked to an unhappy childhood and lack of parental warmth and attention. Comedians use humour as a defense or coping mechanism to escape their troubles.

Supporting this statement is the example of JIm Carrey. His mother was ill when he was young and he had a difficult childhood. In his 60 Minutes interview he said:

“I had a sick mom, man. I wanted to make her feel better. Basically, I think she laid in bed and took a lot of pain pills. And I wanted to make her feel better. And I used to go in there and do impressions of praying mantises, and weird things, and whatever. I’d bounce off the walls and throw myself down the stairs to make her feel better.”

In fact, taking a look at the bigger picture, humour and comedic antics are like a ladder to climb out of the pit of inner turmoil if only temporarily. This is the essence of Jewish humour. According to psychologist Samuel Janus, Jewish humour is born of depression and alienation from the general culture. For Jewish comedians, “comedy is a defence mechanism to ward off the aggression and hostility of others.”

There have been links established between creativity and mental illness like depression and bipolar disorder and humour does involve creative elements of cognition. An Oxford University study compared 500 or so comedians to a control group and their findings affirm the correlation between humour and depression. According to the study author Gordon Claridge, “The creative elements needed to produce humour are strikingly similar to those characterizing the cognitive style of people with psychosis—both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.” He also added that comedians use their act as a form of self-medication.

Thinking about it, life is unfair in how people who make others laugh have no one to make them happy.

Movie Review- 22 Jump Street

Rating:****

Cast: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum, Ice Cube etc.


“It’s always worse the second time around” says deputy police chief Hardy in the beginning of 22 Jump Street but he could not have been more wrong. While sequels have disappointed in the case of comedies like Grown Ups and Meet the Parents, 22 Jump Street defies the odds.

Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill reprise their roles as Greg Jenko and Morton Schmidt, who take their undercover mission to the next level by infiltrating a college drug ring with the usual slapstick comedic mayhem that defines the movie franchise what with sleeping with the captain’s daughter and chase sequences through the university campus. Jonah Hill proves his versatility in playing a bumbling cop with a heart after his Academy award nominated role in Wolf of Wall Street. Channing Tatum proves he’s not just a hunk but a real comedic asset to the film as a goofy jock. Ice Cube as the expletive-spouting captain with a permanently ingrained scowl is easily one of the best reasons to watch this sequel.

Hilarity ensues through out the film and perhaps a warning ought to be issued prior to its commencement saying “The following movie may cause respiratory difficulty resulting from uncontrollable laughter.”

However, not everything about the film is an in-your-face jest. The name of the fictitious drug this time is Why-phy (pronounced WiFi), cleverly making a remark on the pandemic that is internet mania amongst college students. After a while, the search for the dealer of Why-phy takes a back seat as Schmidt and Jenko are forced to see how different they are and explore different paths as if they were on a break like Rachel and Ross from Friends. Something about Tatum and Hill’s bromance in the film gets the audience hooked as if they were an actual couple we want to see get back together. And of course they do.

In fact, in the end credits we see a multitude of future sequels that play like a spoof of the franchise, ranging from Culinary School to Dance School with a small appearance from Seth Rogen! The credits are a must-watch and show us how the makers of Jump Street can parody their own film while retaining its quality as a movie. That is why Jump Street won’t end at 22 but could also go on to 2121 Jump Street!

An Inspired Foodie Thought

Every home is a restaurant with its own head chef and sous chefs. There’s a different menu and a different cuisine. Before the food arrives at the table, there are disasters in the kitchen and moments of inspiration that make a dish all the better. There are impatient people waiting for their meal at the dining table and there are those handy helpers at home who act as the waiters by bringing and serving food to everyone. 

Every home has a secret ingredient. It could be love, it could be hatred and that is what defines the food within that household. That’s why food in each home tastes different.

There are millions of unique restaurants across the world, skittered down the streets, both well-lit and struggling for light. So much to be tasted, yet so much left wasted.

Eat in a home and you will pay nothing but receive everything. It’s the best kind of restaurant there is.

7 Paths to Take in the Life-long Pursuit of Happiness

In my literature class arose a question on happiness.What is it? Is it a true state of being or is it an illusion we aspire to gain as if it were attainable? Perhaps there is no way of ‘being’ happy and happiness lies in it’s pursuit.

So, in contradiction to those posts on how to ‘be’ happy, I’m going to write about seven paths to take in the pursuit of happiness because it’s not the destination we ought to be concerned about but the journey.

So here goes…

1. Put on a pair of comfortable shoes and go out for a walk. Alone. Walk, walk and then keep walking, listening to your favourite playlist and stop occasionally to people watch. You’ll enter the brink between connection and disconnection one rarely feels but needs at times to recharge from a harrowing and seemingly monotonous daily cycle. It’s not as simple as eat, sleep, rave, repeat, after all. 

*If you can’t actually go for a walk, take a mental one. Close your eyes and allow your mind to wander. Most likely, our minds delve deeper into what are called mental laboratories like the woods or the sea. 

2. Embrace new phases without wondering if they’ll last longer than a day or a month and immerse yourself in it. Do you know what slam poetry is? Or the Beat Movement? How about method acting or McDonald’s triad? Go forth and find what comes to you (which may very well be a juxtaposition). Talk to people about it, spread whatever you find, stalk the subject on the internet and get really into it. Everyone says obsessions or what I like to call momentary passion is a phase as if were a bad thing and we should be an eternal rock in the sea of life but that’s not true. Phases are the stages of life through which we transition into the person we will become and keep becoming because you will never ‘be’ yourself. You are becoming yourself.

3. Cook a meal and wonder at the process of taking separate ingredients and integrating them into a wholesome or perhaps not-so-wholesome dish. Eat it, share it but don’t waste it because food is what I would say is an effective path to being happy. Sometimes you can bake a cake and eat it yourself, literally.

4. Reminisce. The past can be a fond friend if you would like it to be. Re-watch one of your favourite cartoons from the 90’s because they were pure gold. Watch the Powerpuff Girls, The Fairly Odd Parents, Scooby Doo, Codename Kids Next Door, I could go on but you know what I’m talking about. It’d do you good to let out your inner child every now and then. It keeps you young at heart and reminds how simple things can be if you choose to see them that way.

5. Help out at an animal shelter whenever you can because I guarantee it will change your perspective on life. Dogs and cats can do that you know. (It’s their superpower.)

6. Christina Yang was on to something when she said “Dance it out!” in the face of adversity. Turn on some music and dance around the house like you couldn’t care less. Dance dirty, do the robot, anything as long as it engages your body. It should let out a good rush of endorphins or feel-good hormones which activate the pleasure centre in your brain. Biology plays a role in the pursuit of happiness too.

7. Painting is pleasing in ways I cannot describe and art doesn’t have to be an escape for only the artistic. Take a kids colouring book and colour in it with a pack of crayons. If you didn’t like colouring in the lines when you were a kid  and you maintain that one shouldn’t be taught that confinement is acceptable then colour outside the lines without a care in the world. It’s not like it’s going to be hung in a gallery or critiqued by others. It’s just for you. Whether you decide to save it or toss it, it will still be time well spent recharging.

Paint a hospital with the colours of life…

“Mere color, unspoiled by meaning, and unallied with definite form, can speak to the soul in a thousand different ways. ”

 -Oscar Wilde

 

Take a book featuring a hospital scene and flip to that page. One word that is guaranteed to describe the daunting experience of diagnoses and tests is white. White walls, white halls and white coats…

Hospitals are blanched of colour just as patients and their families are of hope. Their minds are poisoned with misery and the upsetting fact that change in the worst possible way is imminent and unstoppable. They do not want walls of white around them.  I know this because when my father was in the hospital,  I did not take comfort in them. Although I never asked him how he felt about those walls, I think he must have hated them as much as I did, if not more.

When I was hospitalised as a kid for amoebiasis, my room was as colourful as it could get, butterflies, green fields, the works. Now that I’m older, if I were hospitalised for the same, I’d be stuck in this boring hospital room fit for ‘adults’. I’d like to redefine what it means to be an adult. It means to be human. If asked, I would still want a room that’s painted with the colours of the wind that Pocahontas sings about because life is full of shades and tints and god forbid, if my last days were to be spent in a single room, I’d want it to be visually loud and reassuring.

I need a rainbow.

Everyone needs a rainbow. 

Think about it. Would you want to be surrounded by a blank canvas or a finished masterpiece?

I vote for the latter. In times of sickness, white reflects our helplessness. Sap green, teal, violet and a plethora of others don’t.

White walls are blank spaces. They make you feel like something is missing and we don’t need to be reminded of that. We need to be reminded of what is good in life and that even if we’ve lost someone, some of those good things are still left to be appreciated. And if you’re leaving this world, you need to know it was good and that you made your mark because…

You’re a colour in that rainbow. A shade no one else can replace in their palette. Because I believe when we are born we are a blank canvas and all our life experiences and the people we meet, hate and love more than anything in the world create a masterpiece that is you.

You are colour to each person. Perhaps yellow to a friend. Blue to an enemy. Purple to your mother. Orange to your father. Red to your sibling.

You’re a colour. You’re anything but white.

But sadly those hospital walls are…

And I think that needs to change.

4 out of 5 dentists recommend this blog :)

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